Metabolic Diseases

1.     Storage diseases 

  • A.     Genetic storage diseases
  • ·         Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria (Porphyrinuria, Pink tooth, Osteohemochromatosis)
  • Congenital erythropoietic porphyria is a rare hereditary disease of cattle, pigs, cats, and humans in which defective hemoglobin formation results in production of an excess of Type I porphyrins in the nuclei of developing normoblasts. For more information click here or call your veterinarian.

  • B.      Acquired storage diseases
  • Acquired storage diseases are caused by the ingestion of plants that contain inhibitors of specific lysosomal catabolic enzymes. Chronic ingestion of locoweed plants (Astragalus or Oxytropis spp) results in an acquired neurologic storage disease. For more information click here or call your veterinarian.

    2.     Puerperal Hypocalcemia in Small Animals (Postpartum hypocalcemia, Periparturient hypocalcemia, Puerperal tetany, Eclampsia) 

    Puerperal hypocalcemia is an acute, life-threatening condition usually seen at peak lactation, 2-3 wk after whelping. Small-breed bitches with large litters are most often affected. Prevention is available. For more information click here or call your veterinarian.

    3.     Fatigue and exercise

  • A.     Fatigue during High-intensity Exercise
  • In general, the cause of fatigue during exercise depends greatly on the duration and energy demands of the event. Highly intense exercise training over many weeks can result in a form of chronic fatigue, referred to as overtraining. For more information click here or call your veterinarian.

  • B.      Fatigue during Prolonged Exercise 
  • During prolonged exercise lasting many hours, heat generated in the course of mainly aerobic ATP resynthesis imposes a thermoregulatory demand on the animal. Responses include sweating and/or panting to remove heat from the body. For more information click here or call your veterinarian.

    4.     Fever of unknown origin

    In both veterinary and human patients, fever may indicate infectious, inflammatory, immune-mediated, or neoplastic disease. In most cases, the history and physical examination reveal the cause of the fever, or the fever resolves spontaneously or in response to antibiotic therapy. However, in a small percentage of patients, the cause of fever is not readily apparent, and the problem becomes persistent or recurrent. These patients are said to have fever of unknown origin (FUO). For more information click here or call your veterinarian.

    5.     Malignant Hyperthermia

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a hypermetabolic syndrome involving skeletal muscle characterized by hyperthermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, increased oxygen consumption, cyanosis, cardiac dysrhythmias, metabolic acidosis, respiratory acidosis, muscle rigidity, unstable arterial blood pressure, and death. For more information click here or call your veterinarian.